Reflections week of 2/13

I was not successful on meeting most of my goals for the 2/13 week. I did prepare all the bushings, and take the first steps on many of the other parts.

Many things prohibited me from reaching my goals, but ultimately, had I been more cautious and forward-thinking, I could have gotten most of the goals finished. The main blockers this week were breaking my finger, which slowed me down considerably and took a lot of time and  money in doctors visits; and machine failures.

To spend my time more efficiently, I plan on getting to the shop when they open at 7am instead of doing errands in the morning. I can do errands after 3:30 when we close. I also plan on using evenings to work on the Sketchup and materials ordering, as I’ve ordered very little of the materials.

The drawing for the punch table

Since my last update, little has happened. I lost most of Thursday because I went to the doctor. I prepared the drawings to torch punch table, and Main Pin Holder, and Main Linkage holder. We have a panograph torch which has a camera, and follows a drawn line to duplicate the line on the piece you’re torching. For it to work properly, you need a special kind of ink, which I could only find in a bottle! I had to buy and learn to use a calligraphy pen. It was kind of fun to break out my architectural drawing tools once more! After that I went to the shop to try torching the punch table at the very least, but the camera wouldn’t pick up the line. We couldn’t figure it out on time for me to leave for the doctors, but later that day, Jimmy opened the circuit box and cleaned it out, and it worked the next day. Unfortunately I didn’t

The Panograph

have the special pen to fix some breaks in the line which prevented the camera from following the entire course of the line. More details and video to follow upon using the torch.

This part needs to be machined from 3" thick to 1.0625", but only in this small area.

Friday was a mess of tools not working properly. I began machining the main linkage on our Jig Bore machine. This is something which can be done using a fly cutter on a mill. We began on the Jig Bore, because its bigger and in better condition than the mill, and a bit easier to work on. However, the auto-feed was not working, and nobody could figure out how to fix it. Since we need to machine  a large part away on the main linkage, it is ridiculous to do it by hand. I will need to machine away roughly 62 layers (the machine can take off about 1/32″ at once) to get the part to size each layer took me about 6 minutes. So, to do so manually is a royal waste of time, when with an autofeed, you can do one layer at a time, and walk away in between layers.

Since our mill has an autofeed, I tried fly-cutting on that. It didn’t work well, as the motor is really weak and kept would getting stuck easily. I also tried fixing the mill, but no avail.

My plan is to ask on a few forums and call an old employee to see if I can fix the auto-feed on the Boring machine. If I can’t figure it out within a few weeks, I’ll do it by hand.

Since neither of these were working, I decided to drill the holes in the linkage. However, we had bits for both the mag-drill and drill press which were about 2.25″, and both of them had such big shanks that they wouldn’t fit into their respective machines! I will need to machine down the drill bit so I can fit it in the drill press.  I’ll drill these holes monday.

Advertisements

3 responses to “Reflections week of 2/13”

  1. Matt Maier says :

    Damn, sounds like that’s turning into quite an adventure 🙂
    Do you think it would be easier to cast most of the parts instead of machining them?

    • bkufa says :

      Oh, adventure it is! The best part is our shop is gonna be infinitely better when I’m done because we’ll fix all the old broken stuff.

      Don’t think casting is the way to go. Casting results in significantly weaker parts. Its also very labor intensive- you gotta make a big mold, and find somewhere to pour the metal. not very replicable. Also, since I never got a firm understanding of the force for shearing (asked many engineers), I want to insure we have as much strength as possible.

  2. Phil Moore says :

    Brianna

    Please shoot me an email. I sent Marcin an email earlier about my skills and he suggested emailing you for help on the ironworker.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: